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Goodding's Willow

Salix gooddingii C. R. Ball

Common Names

provided by Fire Effects Information System Plants
More info for the terms: shrub, tree

Goodding's willow
black willow
Dudley willow
valley willow
western black willow

TAXONOMY:
The scientific name of Goodding's willow is Salix gooddingii Ball.
(Salicaceae) [16,19,30].

Some authorities consider S. gooddingii a western variety of S. nigra.
Dorn, however, considered them distinct species, citing differences in
chemistry [30,34].


LIFE FORM:
Tree, Shrub

FEDERAL LEGAL STATUS:
No special status

OTHER STATUS:
NO-ENTRY



DISTRIBUTION AND OCCURRENCE
SPECIES: Salix gooddingii
GENERAL DISTRIBUTION:
Goodding's willow is distributed from northern California to western
Colorado and south to southern California and Texas. It is also found
in river valleys of northern Mexico [16,18,19,29,31].
license
cc-publicdomain
bibliographic citation
Reed, William R. 1993. Salix gooddingii In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/

Distribution

provided by Fire Effects Information System Plants
Goodding's willow is distributed from northern California to western Colorado and south to southern California and Texas. It is also found in river valleys of northern Mexico [16,18,19,29,31]. Distribution of Goodding's willow. Map courtesy of USDA, NRCS. 2018. The PLANTS Database. National Plant Data Team, Greensboro, NC [2018, June 21] [29].
license
cc-publicdomain
bibliographic citation
Reed, William R. 1993. Salix gooddingii In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/

Key Plant Community Associations

provided by Fire Effects Information System Plants
More info for the terms: natural, tree

Goodding's willow is dominant in many riparian communities of the West,
where it frequently codominates with Fremont cottonwood (Populus
fremontii) [24,27,28]. It is listed as a dominant plant species in the
following published classifications:

Classification of riparian habitat in the Southwest [21]
Southwestern riparian plant communities: site characteristics,
tree species distributions, and size-class structures [28]
Terrestrial natural communities of California [11]

Common plant associates of Goodding's willow are Arizona sycamore
(Platanus wrightii), mesquite (Prosopis spp.), desertwillow (Chilopsis
linearis), and southwestern condalia (Condalia lyciodes) [7,9].
license
cc-publicdomain
bibliographic citation
Reed, William R. 1993. Salix gooddingii In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/

Life Form

provided by Fire Effects Information System Plants
More info for the terms: shrub, tree

Tree, Shrub
license
cc-publicdomain
bibliographic citation
Reed, William R. 1993. Salix gooddingii In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/

Phenology

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More info on this topic.

Catkins of Goodding's willow appear in early March. Seeds ripen and are dispersed in early spring [5,18,27].
license
cc-publicdomain
bibliographic citation
Reed, William R. 1993. Salix gooddingii In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/

Post-fire Regeneration

provided by Fire Effects Information System Plants
More info for the terms: root crown, root sucker, shrub

Tree with adventitious-bud root crown/soboliferous species root sucker Tall shrub, adventitious-bud root crown Initial-offsite colonizer (off-site, initial community)
license
cc-publicdomain
bibliographic citation
Reed, William R. 1993. Salix gooddingii In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/

Taxonomy

provided by Fire Effects Information System Plants
The scientific name of Goodding's willow is Salix gooddingii Ball.
(Salicaceae) [16,19,30].

Some authorities consider S. gooddingii a western variety of S. nigra.
Dorn, however, considered them distinct species, citing differences in
chemistry [30,34].
license
cc-publicdomain
bibliographic citation
Reed, William R. 1993. Salix gooddingii In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/

Salix gooddingii

provided by wikipedia EN

Salix gooddingii is a species of willow known by the common name Goodding's willow, or Goodding's black willow. It was named for its collector, Leslie Newton Goodding.[1]

Salix gooddingii is native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, where it grows in moist and wet habitat in many types of habitat from mountains to desert. It is a common riparian species. It is a tree growing to 3 to 30 m (9.8 to 98.4 ft) tall, with thick, furrowed, shreddy bark and many thin branches. The leaves are up to 13 cm long, generally lance-shaped, and finely serrated along the edges. The young leaves are coated in hairs. The inflorescence is a catkin of flowers up to 8 cm long.

References

  1. ^ a b S. gooddingii was first described and published in Botanical Gazette; Paper of Botanical Notes, 40(5): 376 (-377; t. 12, figs. 1-2). 1905. Crawfordsville, Indiana and Chicago, Illinois. "Plant Name Details for Salix gooddingii". IPNI. Retrieved September 4, 2010. originally written as "gooddingi"; Distribution: Nevada; Collector: L. N. Goodding; Locality: Muddy Creek: ditchy banks (Muddy Creek is a tributary of the Virgin River, which flows into the Colorado in Lincoln County, in extreme southeastern Nevada); Collection Date: 1902-5-2

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Salix gooddingii: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Salix gooddingii is a species of willow known by the common name Goodding's willow, or Goodding's black willow. It was named for its collector, Leslie Newton Goodding.

Salix gooddingii is native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, where it grows in moist and wet habitat in many types of habitat from mountains to desert. It is a common riparian species. It is a tree growing to 3 to 30 m (9.8 to 98.4 ft) tall, with thick, furrowed, shreddy bark and many thin branches. The leaves are up to 13 cm long, generally lance-shaped, and finely serrated along the edges. The young leaves are coated in hairs. The inflorescence is a catkin of flowers up to 8 cm long.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN