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Unresolved name

Coryphoideae

Coryphoideae

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The Coryphoideae is one of five subfamilies in the palm family, Arecaceae.[2][3][4] It contains all of the genera with palmate leaves, excepting Mauritia, Mauritiella and Lepidocaryum, all of subfamily Calamoideae, tribe Lepidocaryeae, subtribe Mauritiinae.[5][4][3] However, all Coryphoid palm leaves have induplicate (V-shaped) leaf folds (excepting Guihaia), while Calamoid palms have reduplicate (inverted V-shaped) leaf folds.[4] Pinnate leaves do occur in Coryphoideae, in Phoenix, Arenga, Wallichia and bipinnate in Caryota.

Classification

Subfamily Coryphoideae is divided into 8 tribes:[3]

The genus Sabinaria was discovered and described after the classification used here[3][4] was published, but its morphology clearly places it in tribe Cryosophileae.[6] The genus Saribus was split from Livistona,[7] while Lanonia was split from Licuala,[8] also after publication. Tribe Trachycarpeae was initially described as tribe 'Livistoneae',[3] but the name Trachycarpeae has priority.[4] Also Uhlia is an extinct genus described from permineralized remains recovered from the Ypresian Princeton Chert in British Columbia, Canada.[9]

References

  1. ^ Dowe, John Leslie (2010). Australian Palms: Biogeography, Ecology and Systematics. CSIRO Publishing. p. 87. ISBN 978-0643096158.
  2. ^ "Arecaceae Bercht. & J. Presl, nom. cons. subfam. Coryphoideae". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2007-04-13. Archived from the original on 2009-08-26. Retrieved 2009-08-17.
  3. ^ a b c d e Dransfield, John; Uhl, Natalie W.; Asmussen, Conny B.; Baker, William J.; Harley, Madeline M.; Lewis, Carl E. (2005). "A new phylogenetic classification of the palm family, Arecaceae". Kew Bulletin. 60: 559–569 – via ResearchGate.
  4. ^ a b c d e Dransfield, John; Uhl, Natalie W.; Asmussen, Conny B.; Baker, William J.; Harley, Madeline M.; Lewis, Carl E. (2008). Genera Palmarum - The Evolution and Classification of Palms. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. ISBN 9781842461822.
  5. ^ Uhl, Natalie W.; Dransfield, John (1987). Genera Palmarum: a classification of palms based on the work of Harold E. Moore Jr. Lawrence, Kansas, U.S.A: The L. H. Bailey Hortorium and the International Palm Society. ISBN 9780935868302.
  6. ^ Bernal, Rodrigo; Galeano, Gloria (2013-11-08). "Sabinaria , a new genus of palms (Cryosophileae, Coryphoideae, Arecaceae) from the Colombia-Panama border". Phytotaxa. 144 (2): 27. doi:10.11646/phytotaxa.144.2.1. ISSN 1179-3163.
  7. ^ Bacon, Christine D.; Baker, William J. (2011). "Saribus Resurrected". Palms. 55 (3): 109–116 – via ResearchGate.
  8. ^ Henderson, Andrew J.; Bacon, Christine D. (2011-10-01). "Lanonia (Arecaceae: Palmae), a New Genus from Asia, with a Revision of the Species". Systematic Botany. 36 (4): 883–895. doi:10.1600/036364411X604903. ISSN 0363-6445. S2CID 84318474.
  9. ^ Erwin, D.M.; Stockey, R.A. (1994). "Permineralized monocotyledons from the middle Eocene Princeton chert (Allenby Formation) of British Columbia: Arecaceae". Palaeontographica Abteilung B. 234: 19–40.

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Coryphoideae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Coryphoideae is one of five subfamilies in the palm family, Arecaceae. It contains all of the genera with palmate leaves, excepting Mauritia, Mauritiella and Lepidocaryum, all of subfamily Calamoideae, tribe Lepidocaryeae, subtribe Mauritiinae. However, all Coryphoid palm leaves have induplicate (V-shaped) leaf folds (excepting Guihaia), while Calamoid palms have reduplicate (inverted V-shaped) leaf folds. Pinnate leaves do occur in Coryphoideae, in Phoenix, Arenga, Wallichia and bipinnate in Caryota.

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