Sorbus scopulina

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Sorbus scopulina is a species of rowan that is native to western North America, primarily in the Rocky Mountains.[1] The common name of this species is often given as Greene's mountain-ash, and is so named in honor of American botanist Edward Lee Greene.[2] Throughout the Cascade Mountains and the Pacific Northwest portions of this rowan's habitat, it is commonly called Cascade mountain-ash, sometimes listed as Sorbus scopulina var. cascadensis.[3]

Various birds and mammals, including bears, eat the fruit.[4] They were eaten by Native Americans and early settlers, and be cooked and made into jelly. They taste bitter when fresh, and are better when they redden. They should not be confused with poisonous baneberries,[5] particularly the red baneberry.[6]

References

  1. ^ a b c d McAllister, H.A. 2005. The genus Sorbus: Mountain Ash and other Rowans . Kew Publishing.
  2. ^ Petrides, George A. and Olivia 1998. "Western Trees". Houghton Mifflin Company.
  3. ^ USDA PLANTS Database
  4. ^ Whitney, Stephen (1985). Western Forests (The Audubon Society Nature Guides). New York: Knopf. p. 399. ISBN 0-394-73127-1.
  5. ^ Reiner, Ralph E. (1969). Introducing the Flowering Beauty of Glacier National Park and the Majestic High Rockies. Glacier Park, Inc. p. 42.
  6. ^ Reiner, Ralph E. (1969). Introducing the Flowering Beauty of Glacier National Park and the Majestic High Rockies. Glacier Park, Inc. p. 116.

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Sorbus scopulina: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Sorbus scopulina is a species of rowan that is native to western North America, primarily in the Rocky Mountains. The common name of this species is often given as Greene's mountain-ash, and is so named in honor of American botanist Edward Lee Greene. Throughout the Cascade Mountains and the Pacific Northwest portions of this rowan's habitat, it is commonly called Cascade mountain-ash, sometimes listed as Sorbus scopulina var. cascadensis.

Various birds and mammals, including bears, eat the fruit. They were eaten by Native Americans and early settlers, and be cooked and made into jelly. They taste bitter when fresh, and are better when they redden. They should not be confused with poisonous baneberries, particularly the red baneberry.

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