Clover - Gardening Encyclopedia

provided by EOL authors

Sweet clovers, also known as Melilotus, and Calvary clover or alfalfa (also called Medicago) are types of clovers categorized under a related genera. Though rare, the plant also comes in species with cinquefoil, quatrefoil or septfoil leaves (often referred to as lucky clovers because they are rare). Quatrefoil plants have four leaves in one.

Clovers are often planted in lawns because they are tolerant to high foot traffic, shades and repeated mowing. However, they are prone to pests and diseases such as the alfalfa weevils, and mosaic and common leaf rot diseases, respectively.

Trefoil plants are rich in phosphorous, proteins and calcium to nourish both its dry and green growth stages. They are excellent nitrogen-fixing plants often used as cover crops. A biennial red clover can add up to 170kg of nitrogen to soil in every one hectare of land.

White clovers (T. repens), red clovers (Trifolium pratense) and alsike clovers (T. hybridum) are the most common species for gardening. White clovers are perennials that tend to creep low. Also known as Alsatian clover or Swedish Clover, Alsike clovers feature globular flower heads with rosy, pink petals. Red clover flowers grow in diameter up to 2.5cm.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-4.0
copyright
Green Valley Supply
bibliographic citation
https://greenvalleysupply.com/blogs/green-valley-supplys-gardening-encyclopedia/cloves Access Web 8-17-2018
author
(bizarre)
original
visit source
partner site
EOL authors

Physical Description

provided by USDA PLANTS text
Perennial, Herbs, Plants with rhizomes or suckers, Taproot present, Nodules present, Plants stoloniferous, Stems erect or ascending, Stems less than 1 m tall, Stems solid, Stems hollow, or spongy, Stems or young twigs glabrous or sparsely glabrate, Leaves alternate, Leaves petiolate, Stipules conspicuous, Stipules green, triangulate to lanceolate or foliaceous, Stipules persistent, Stipules clasping stem at the base, Stipules adnate to petiole, Leaves compound, Leaves palmately 2-3 foliate, Leaflets dentate or denticulate, Leaflets 3, Leaves glabrous or nearly so, Inflorescences race mes, Inflorescences globose heads, capitate or subcapitate, Inflorescence axillary, Bracteoles present, Flowers zygomorphic, Calyx 5-lobed, Calyx glabrous, Petals separate, Corolla papilionaceous, Petals clawed, Petals white, Petals blue, lavander to purple, or violet, Petals bicolored or with red, purple or yellow streaks or spots, Banner petal narrow or oblanceolate, Wing petals narrow, oblanceolate to oblong, Wing petals auriculate, Wing tips obtuse or rounded, Keel tips obtuse or rounded, not beaked, Stamens 9-10, Stamens diadelphous, 9 united, 1 free, Filaments glabrous, Style terete, Fruit a legume, Fruit unilocular, Fruit indehiscent, Fruit oblong or ellipsoidal, Fruit orbicular to subglobose, Fruit or valves persistent on stem, Fruit enclosed in calyx, Fruit glabrous or glabrate, Fruit 3-10 seeded, Seeds cordiform, mit-shaped, notched at one end, Seed surface smooth, Seeds olive, brown, or black.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
compiler
Dr. David Bogler
source
Missouri Botanical Garden
source
USDA NRCS NPDC
original
visit source
partner site
USDA PLANTS text

Trifolium wormskioldii

provided by wikipedia EN

Trifolium wormskioldii is a species of clover.[1] Its common names include cows clover,[2] coast clover, sand clover, seaside clover, springbank clover,[3] and Wormskjold's clover.[1]

This plant is native to the western half of North America from Alaska, through California, to Mexico. It grows in many locales, from beaches to mountain ridges, below about 3,200 metres (10,500 ft) in elevation.[4]

Habitats it grows in include chaparral, oak woodland, grassland, yellow pine forest, red fir forest, lodgepole forest, subalpine forest, and wetlandriparian

Description

Trifolium wormskioldii, a legume, is a perennial herb sometimes taking a matlike form, with decumbent or upright stems. The leaves are made up of leaflets measuring 1 to 3 centimeters long. The lower stipules are tipped with bristles and the upper stipules may be toothed.

The rounded inflorescences are 2 or 3 centimeter wide. The sepals are bristle-tipped. The corollas are pinkish purple or magenta with white tips.[4]

Uses

Many Native American groups of western North America use this clover for food. The herbage and flowers are eaten raw, sometimes salted. The roots are commonly steamed or boiled and eaten with fish, fish eggs, and fish grease.[5]

This species is host to the caterpillar of the Western cloudywing butterfly (Thorybes diversus).[6]

Etymology

The species was given its scientific name in honour of the Danish botanist Morten Wormskjold.[7]

References

  1. ^ a b Trifolium wormskioldii. The Nature Conservancy.
  2. ^ "Trifolium wormskioldii". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 15 December 2015.
  3. ^ "Trifolium wormskioldii". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Retrieved 19 January 2018.
  4. ^ a b Jepson T. wormskioldii
  5. ^ Trifolium wormskioldii. Native American Ethnobotany. University of Michigan, Dearborn.
  6. ^ Thorybes diversus. Butterflies and Moths of North America.
  7. ^ Charters, M. L. "wormskioldii". California Plant Names: Latin and Greek Meanings and Derivations.

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Trifolium wormskioldii: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Trifolium wormskioldii is a species of clover. Its common names include cows clover, coast clover, sand clover, seaside clover, springbank clover, and Wormskjold's clover.

This plant is native to the western half of North America from Alaska, through California, to Mexico. It grows in many locales, from beaches to mountain ridges, below about 3,200 metres (10,500 ft) in elevation.

Habitats it grows in include chaparral, oak woodland, grassland, yellow pine forest, red fir forest, lodgepole forest, subalpine forest, and wetlandriparian

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN