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Unresolved name

Lesser Peachtree Borer

Synanthedon pictipes (Grote & Robinson)

Conservation Status

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Uncommon in Alberta. A well-known economic pest of peach trees in eastern North America.
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Cyclicity

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Adults have been collected in Alberta in July.
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Distribution

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Widespread in the eastern half of North America, from Nova Scotia to Florida and west to Manitoba and Minnesota and Texas. It has also been collected recently in the Edmonton area.
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General Description

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"A small (1.7-2.5 cm wingspan) wasp-like diurnal clearwing moth. The antennae, head, thorax, body and legs are mostly blue-black, with some pale yellow and white scaling on the head and palps, the tegulae, and abominal segments one and two (pale yellow laterally) and ventrally on the posterior of segment four. Anal tuft blue-black with a trace of white on the margins. The wings are mostly hyaline, with a faint amber tint in many specimens, very narrow dark margins (including fringe), and a well marked discal bar. Male genitalia has a greatly reduced crista sacculi only slightly visible near the ventral margin of the valve. Males are easily separated from similar S. fatifera by the all black antennae (apical one-third white in fatifera) and from other similar Alberta species by the small size and very narrow wing margins. "
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Habitat

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Woodlands and gardens with fruit trees and shrubs such as cherry, saskatoon and other Rosaceae.
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Trophic Strategy

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Larvae bore beneath the bark of the limbs, trunk and occasionally in the roots of Rosaceae, including cultivated peaches, plums and cherries (Prunus sp.) as well as native cherries (Prunus), Saskatoon (Amelanchier) and others. They apparently prefer parts of the hosts with injuries or abnormalities, such as black-knot fungus knots on chokecherry.
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Synanthedon pictipes

provided by wikipedia EN

Synanthedon pictipes, the lesser peachtree borer, is a moth of the family Sesiidae. It is known from the eastern half of Canada and the United States westward to Minnesota in the north and eastern Texas in the south.

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Larva
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Damage

The wingspan is 18–25 mm. Adults are black with a metallic sheen and whitish yellowish markings on the head and thorax and a narrow band on the abdomen. The wings are transparent. Males and females are similar, but males are more slender and have a finely tufted antenna. Adults emerge over the entire growing season, but peaking in spring and early summer. Spring generations emerge from early April to late July, while summer generations emerge from early July to November. There are two generations per year in the south and one (although sometimes a partial second) generation occurs in the north.

The larvae feed on peach, plum, cherry, beach plum and black cherry. Peach is the major cultivated plant host and the principal native wild plants attacked are cherry and plum. The larvae usually establish in bark cavities around wound margins and may infest old uninjured trees that have rough bark. Cytospora species cankers are particularly favorable for invasion. When development is completed, larvae construct cocoons to pupate.[2]

References

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Synanthedon pictipes: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Synanthedon pictipes, the lesser peachtree borer, is a moth of the family Sesiidae. It is known from the eastern half of Canada and the United States westward to Minnesota in the north and eastern Texas in the south.

 src= Larva  src= Damage

The wingspan is 18–25 mm. Adults are black with a metallic sheen and whitish yellowish markings on the head and thorax and a narrow band on the abdomen. The wings are transparent. Males and females are similar, but males are more slender and have a finely tufted antenna. Adults emerge over the entire growing season, but peaking in spring and early summer. Spring generations emerge from early April to late July, while summer generations emerge from early July to November. There are two generations per year in the south and one (although sometimes a partial second) generation occurs in the north.

The larvae feed on peach, plum, cherry, beach plum and black cherry. Peach is the major cultivated plant host and the principal native wild plants attacked are cherry and plum. The larvae usually establish in bark cavities around wound margins and may infest old uninjured trees that have rough bark. Cytospora species cankers are particularly favorable for invasion. When development is completed, larvae construct cocoons to pupate.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN