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Comprehensive Description

provided by Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
Caulerpa sertularioides (S. G. Gmelin) M. Howe

Fucus sertularioides S. G. Gmelin, 1768:151, pl. 15: fig. 4.

Caulerpa sertularioides (S. G. Gmelin) M. Howe, 1905:576; Dawson, 1944:213; Taylor, 1945:63; Dawson, 1949:244–245; Dawson, 1959a:4, 6, 7, 14; Dawson, 1961b: 381; Huerta-Múzquiz and Tirado-Lizárraga, 1970:126; Huerta-Múzquiz and Tirado-Lizárraga, 1970:121–122, 127, 131, 134, 136; Chávez B., 1972:268; Earle, 1972:85; Huerta-Múzquiz, 1978:338, 340; Huerta-Múzquiz and Mendoza-González, 1985:44; Mendoza-González and Mateo-Cid, 1986:420; Ortega et al., 1987:80; Sánchez-Vargas and Hendrickx, 1987:161; Salcedo-Martínez et al., 1988:82; Sánchez-Rodriguez et al., 1989:39; Rocha-Ramírez and Siqueiros-Beltrones, 1991:24; Mateo-Cid and Mendoza-González, 1991:28; Martínez-Lozano et al., 1991:23; Mateo-Cid and Mendoza-González, 1992:25; León-Tejera and González-González, 1993:497; León-Tejera et al., 1993:199, 204; González-González, 1993:443; Mateo-Cid et al., 1993:52; Mendoza-González et al., 1994:113; González-González et al., 1996:277, 366–367; Anaya-Reyna and Riosmena-Rodríguez, 1996:862, 863; Galindo-Villegas et al., 1997:4; Mendoza-González and Mateo-Cid, 1998:25, 27–28; Yoshida, 1998:103; Cruz-Ayala et al., 1998:192; Rodríguez-Morales and Siqueiros-Beltrones, 1999:22; Paul-Chávez and Riosmena-Rodríguez, 2000:146; López et al., 2000:339; Mateo-Cid et al., 2000a:60, 70; Cruz-Ayala et al., 2001:190; Scrosati, 2001:722; Beltrán-Magallanes, 2002:44; Carballo et al., 2002:753; Abbott and Huisman, 2004:124, fig. 45B,C; Hodgson et al., 2004:32; López et al., 2004:10; Wysor, 2004:224; Riosmena-Rodríguez et al., 2005:101; Pedroche et al., 2005:67; Servière-Zaragoza et al., 2007:3, 7.

Algae with erect (feather-like) fronds, in the northern Gulf mostly less than 7.0 cm tall, arising from a short cylindrical stalk above the horizontal stolon, attached below by rhizoids. Fronds 2–7(–11) cm long and up to 1 cm wide, most simple and unbranched or occasionally branched; with a terete main axes bearing opposite cylindrical branchlets; branchlets not constricted at base, usually closely adjacent, and curved upward, with pointed tips.

HABITAT. In sandy habitats and in crevices and tide pools; attached to sand, on rocks or broken shells; low intertidal to shallow subtidal.

DISTRIBUTION. Gulf of California: Bahía San Carlos; Bahía Concepción to Punta Los Frailes; Mazatlán (Bahía de Altata to Estero del Urías), Sinaloa. Pacific coast: Bahía Magdalena, Baja California Sur; Islas Revillagigedo; Nayarit to Chiapas; Panama; Hawaiian Islands; China; Japan.

TYPE LOCALITY. “… nonnisi [only] in coralliis americanis” (Gmelin, 1768:151); “no definite locality is given” (Howe, 1905:576); “possibly tropical Atlantic America” (Hodgson et al., 2004:32).
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bibliographic citation
Norris, James N. 2010. "Marine algae of the northern Gulf of California : Chlorophyta and Phaeophyceae." Smithsonian Contributions to Botany. 276-276. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.0081024X.94.276

Comprehensive Description

provided by Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
Caulerpa sertularioides (Gmelin) Howe

St. Paul: 1, 67–363, drifted ashore. St. Joseph: 2, R–319, 67–463, on cobbles at about 6 dm depth. St. Andrew: 11, R–186, on the inshore reef.
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bibliographic citation
Taylor, William Randolph and Rhyne, Charles F. 1970. "Marine Algae of Dominica." Smithsonian Contributions to Botany. 1-16. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.0081024X.3

Caulerpa sertularioides

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Green Feather Algae (Caulerpa sertularioides), A pretty algae species loved by green sea turtles and sea slugs in the shallow waters around Munyon Island.

Caulerpa sertularioides, also known as green feather algae,[1][2] is a species of seaweed in the Caulerpaceae family found in warm water environments.[3]

Description

The seaweed has a pale to dark-green thallus that typically grows to outward to around 0.35 to 2 metres (1.15 to 6.56 ft).[3] It has feather-like fronds that arise from a common stolon. Each of the fronds is upright and branched. The oppositely arranged branchlets are cylindrical to needle-shaped with upcurved tips with a blunt point at the end. Each branchlet has a length of 3 to 11 millimetres (0.118 to 0.433 in) and is attached to a cylindrical axis in the middle with a diameter of 1 to 1.5 mm (0.039 to 0.059 in). Each axis connects each frond to a creeping stolon with a diameter of 2 to 2.5 mm (0.079 to 0.098 in) and a length of up to 2 metres (7 ft). Stolons are branched out to slim points and rhizoids then form from bottom surface[1] these fork and penetrate the sandy substrate firmly anchoring the seaweed to the seafloor.[2]

Taxonomy

The species was first formally described by the botanist and taxonomist Marshall Avery Howe in 1905 as part of the work Phycological studies - II. New Chlorophyceae, new Rhodophyceae and miscellaneous notes as published in the Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club. The basionym is Fucus sertularioides as described by Samuel Gottlieb Gmelin in 1768.[4]

Distribution

The species is found widely through tropical waters. In the United States it is found from North Carolina to Florida. It is also found throughout the Caribbean around Bermuda, Bahamas, Greater and Lesser Antilles and in the Gulf of Mexico and in the southern Atlantic Ocean to Brazil (Taylor 1979). It is also found in the Pacific Ocean along the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines and Palau.[1] In Western Australia, it is found along the coast in the Kimberley region extending south to the Gascoyne.[3]

The species is usually part of coastal and estuarine environments where it grows in sandy areas, as seagrass beds or on and around mangrove roots. It is mostly found as a shallow-water specimen to depths of around 10 metres (33 ft) although sparse individuals have been taken from depths of up to 110 metres (361 ft).[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Caulerpa sertularioides SG Gmelin Howe, 1905 Green Feather Alga". Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory. Smithsonian Institution. 2018. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Green feather alga (Caulerpa sertularioides)". Interactive Guide to Caribbean Diving. Marine Species Identification. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  3. ^ a b c "Caulerpa sertularioides". FloraBase. Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife.
  4. ^ Guiry, M.D. & Guiry, G.M. (2018). "Caulerpa sertularioides (S.G.Gmelin) M.Howe". AlgaeBase. National University of Ireland, Galway. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
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Caulerpa sertularioides: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN
 src= Green Feather Algae (Caulerpa sertularioides), A pretty algae species loved by green sea turtles and sea slugs in the shallow waters around Munyon Island.

Caulerpa sertularioides, also known as green feather algae, is a species of seaweed in the Caulerpaceae family found in warm water environments.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN