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Conservation Status

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A widespread and fairly common species. No concerns.
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Cyclicity

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Adults emerge and are on the wing in early spring, late April and May.
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Distribution

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Across much of southern Canada, east of the mountains. In Alberta, widespread in the Aspen Parkland and southern Boreal Forest regions, north to the northern Peace River district (northwest of Dixonville). There are few records for the foothills, and it is replaced in the mountains by G. severa.
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General Description

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A medium-size (3.3-4.0 cm. wingspan) grey and light tan moth, easily mistaken for the very similar G. severa. Separated from severa by the diffuse black blotch on the lower forewing just inside the median line in lintneri. The antennae are pectinate, broadly in males, narrowly in females. The three large species of Gluphisia can also be separated by male genitalic characters, notably the shape of the juxta, transtilla and uncus. In lintneri the uncus is shallowly excavated, the lobes of the transtilla are long and acute, and the juxta is broad and narrowly excavated, with the lobes broad and square. See also G. avimacula. There is also a rare form ("pretians") where the median area of the forewing is crossed by a wide, black contrasting band.
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Habitat

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Aspen woodland and mixedwood forest with aspen.
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Life Cycle

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Lintner's Pebble is among the first moths to emerge from the pupae each spring. Adults are nocturnal and come readily to light. The larvae are solitary defoliators of aspen poplar. They overwinter as pupae.
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Trophic Strategy

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No Alberta data available. Elsewhere in Canada aspen poplar (Populus tremuloides). (Prentice et al, 1962).
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Gluphisia lintneri

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Gluphisia lintneri, the Lintner's gluphisia moth or Lintner's pebble, is a species of moth in the family Notodontidae (the prominents).[1][2][3][4] It was first described by Augustus Radcliffe Grote in 1877 and it is found in North America.[1]

The MONA or Hodges number for Gluphisia lintneri is 7934.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b "Gluphisia lintneri Report". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 2018-04-30.
  2. ^ "Gluphisia lintneri species details". Catalogue of Life. Retrieved 2018-04-30.
  3. ^ "Gluphisia lintneri". GBIF. Retrieved 2018-04-30.
  4. ^ "Gluphisia lintneri Species Information". BugGuide. Retrieved 2018-04-30.
  5. ^ "North American Moth Photographers Group, Gluphisia lintneri". Retrieved 2018-04-30.
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Gluphisia lintneri: Brief Summary

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Gluphisia lintneri, the Lintner's gluphisia moth or Lintner's pebble, is a species of moth in the family Notodontidae (the prominents). It was first described by Augustus Radcliffe Grote in 1877 and it is found in North America.

The MONA or Hodges number for Gluphisia lintneri is 7934.

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