Image of <i>Spirobranchus lamarcki</i> (Quatrefages 1866)
Creatures » » Animals » » Segmented Worms » » Calcareous Tubeworms »

Spirobranchus lamarcki (Quatrefages 1866)

Brief Summary

provided by Ecomare
You often find keel worms on fish crates and other drifting objects which wash ashore. There are all kinds of species. The large tubes in the picture above are from the Pomatoceros triqueter, which you also find on stones. The small spiral tubes are Spirorbis spirorbis, which are often found on large brown seaweed species such as bladder wrack. They eat plankton, which they filter through a crown of feathery tentacles.
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
Copyright Ecomare
provider
Ecomare
original
visit source
partner site
Ecomare

Pomatoceros lamarckii

provided by wikipedia EN

Pomatoceros lamarckii is a species of tube-building annelid worms which is widespread in intertidal and sub-littoral zones around the United Kingdom and northern Europe. They are found attached to firm substrates, from rocks to animal shells to man made structures, and often are noted for their detrimental effect on shipping.[1] It is closely related to, and often confused with, Pomatoceros triqueter.

Pomatoceros lamarckii has been the subject of a number of scientific investigations, due to its presence near sites of historic scientific study, relatively underived mode of development [2] and slowly evolving genetic complement.[3] Recently this organism has been the subject of in depth transcriptomic investigation.[4]

 src=
Pomatoceros lamarckii development

References

  1. ^ Hamer, John P; Walker, Graham; Latchford, John W (2001). "Settlement of Pomatoceros lamarkii (Serpulidae) larvae on biofilmed surfaces and the effect of aerial drying". Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. 260 (1): 113–131. doi:10.1016/S0022-0981(01)00247-7. PMID 11358574.
  2. ^ McDougall, Carmel; Chen, Wei-Chung; Shimeld, Sebastian M; Ferrier, David EK (1 January 2006). "The development of the larval nervous system, musculature and ciliary bands of Pomatoceros lamarckii (Annelida): Heterochrony in polychaetes". Frontiers in Zoology. 3 (1): 16. doi:10.1186/1742-9994-3-16. PMC 1615870. PMID 17032451.
  3. ^ Takahashi, Tokiharu; McDougall, Carmel; Troscianko, Jolyon; Chen, Wei-Chung; Jayaraman-Nagarajan, Ahamarshan; Shimeld, Sebastian M; Ferrier, David EK (1 January 2009). "An EST screen from the annelid Pomatoceros lamarckii reveals patterns of gene loss and gain in animals". BMC Evolutionary Biology. 9 (1): 240. doi:10.1186/1471-2148-9-240. PMC 2762978. PMID 19781084.
  4. ^ Kenny, Nathan J; Shimeld, Sebastian M (2012). "Additive multiple k-mer transcriptome of the keelworm Pomatoceros lamarckii (Annelida; Serpulidae) reveals annelid trochophore transcription factor cassette". Development Genes and Evolution. 222 (6): 325–339. doi:10.1007/s00427-012-0416-6. PMID 23053624. S2CID 10930299.
 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Pomatoceros lamarckii: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Pomatoceros lamarckii is a species of tube-building annelid worms which is widespread in intertidal and sub-littoral zones around the United Kingdom and northern Europe. They are found attached to firm substrates, from rocks to animal shells to man made structures, and often are noted for their detrimental effect on shipping. It is closely related to, and often confused with, Pomatoceros triqueter.

Pomatoceros lamarckii has been the subject of a number of scientific investigations, due to its presence near sites of historic scientific study, relatively underived mode of development and slowly evolving genetic complement. Recently this organism has been the subject of in depth transcriptomic investigation.

 src= Pomatoceros lamarckii development
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN