dcsimg

Distribution in Egypt

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Nile region.

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Global Distribution

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Native to south America, naturalized in warm regions.

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Habitat

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Waste ground.

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Life Expectancy

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Like pubescent annual.

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Comments

provided by eFloras
Whole plant, especially seeds, toxic. The flowers are used as an anaesthetic.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 17: 330 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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Description

provided by eFloras
Herbs annual, 0.5-1.5 m tall, glabrescent. Stems often dark violet. Petiole 2-6 cm; leaf blade ovate or broadly ovate, 5-20 × 4-l5 cm, membranous, glabrescent, base truncate or cuneate, asymmetrical, margin irregularly sinuate-dentate, lobed, or entire, apex acuminate; veins 4-6 pairs. Flowers erect. Pedicel ca. 1 cm. Calyx tubular, 4-9 cm. Corolla white, yellowish, or pale purple, funnelform, sometimes doubled or tripled, 14-20 cm; limb 6-10 cm in diam.; lobes elongate. Anthers 1-1.2 cm. Capsules deflexed, subglobose, ca. 3 cm in diam., tuberculate, irregularly 4-valved, subtended by remnants of persistent calyx. Seeds pale brown, reniform-discoid, ca. 3 mm in diam. Fl. and fr. Mar-Dec.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 17: 330 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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eFloras

Distribution

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Tropical America, widely cultivated and naturalised elsewhere.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
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K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
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Distribution

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Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hainan, Taiwan, Yunnan [native of the Americas, long introduced and naturalized in Asia]
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 17: 330 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
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Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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Elevation Range

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300-1200 m
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
author
K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
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eFloras.org
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Habitat

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Grassy and sunny slopes, near houses, also commonly cultivated in many cities; 1200-2100 m.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 17: 330 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
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Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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Synonym

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Datura alba Nees; D. fastuosa Linnaeus; D. fastuosa var. alba (Nees) C. B. Clarke.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 17: 330 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Description

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Herb or shrub to 2 m, sometimes tinged purple or violet. Stems glabrous or sparsely pubescent, not viscid. Leaves petiolate; lamina 4-24 cm, ovate, entire to somewhat lobed; base often markedly asymmetric. Flowers solitary, rarely paid, erect at first, drooping later. Corolla 12-19 cm, showy, white, yellow, purple or violet, trumpet-shaped, single, double or even triple. Fruit somewhat upright to nodding, irregularly breaking up when ripe, covered with stout conical spines or tubercles. Seeds whitish to brown.
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Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Datura metel L. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/cult/species.php?species_id=165470
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Mark Hyde
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Bart Wursten
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Petra Ballings
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Worldwide distribution

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Native to America. Cultivated for ornament or medicinal pirposes and widely naturalised in the tropics and subtropics.
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Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Datura metel L. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/cult/species.php?species_id=165470
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Mark Hyde
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Bart Wursten
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Petra Ballings
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Flora of Zimbabwe

Datura metel

provided by wikipedia EN

Datura metel is a shrub-like annual (zone 5-7) or perennial (zone 8-10) herb, commonly known as devil's trumpet and metel. Datura metel grows in the wild in all the warmer parts of the world, such as India and is cultivated worldwide for its chemical and ornamental properties. This plant was first described by Carl Linnaeus in 1753, but no botanically correct illustrations or descriptions were made until after the New World was settled. The original home of the plant remains uncertain as a result.[3]

The plant is an annual or perennial herb growing up to 3 ft (0.91 m) high. It is slightly furry, with dark violet shoots and oval to broad oval leaves that are often dark violet as well. The pleasantly-scented 6–8 in (15–20 cm) flowers are immensely varied, and can be single or double. Colors range from white to cream, yellow, red, and violet. The seed capsule is covered with numerous conical humps and a few spines.[3] It is similar to D. innoxia, but D. metel has almost glabrous leaves and fruits that are knobby, not spiny. D. innoxia is pilose all over and has a spiny fruit.

Toxicity

All parts of Datura plants contain dangerous levels of highly poisonous tropane alkaloids and may be fatal if ingested by humans or other animals, including livestock and pets. In some places, it is prohibited to buy, sell, or cultivate Datura plants.[3]

Datura metel may be toxic if ingested in a tiny quantity, symptomatically expressed as flushed skin, headaches, hallucinations, and possibly convulsions or even a coma. The principal toxic elements are tropane alkaloids. Ingesting even a single leaf can lead to severe side effects.[4]

Use in traditional medicine

Datura metel is one of the 50 fundamental herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine, where it is called yáng jīn huā (). However, the ingestion of D. metel in any form is dangerous and should be treated with extreme caution. According to Drug & Cosmetic Act 1940 & Rule 1995, Datura metel is banned in India for use in Ayurvedic medicine.

Black daturas (Datura metel 'Fastuosa')

"
Datura metel
"
Datura metel plant

A cultivar of D. metel with a polished-looking ebony-black stem exists as a garden plant. Its flowers normally have a double or triple corolla, each corolla having a deep purple exterior and white or off-white interior. The plant is already reported to have become naturalised in Israel (see illustration). The black cultivar might become a common roadside dweller, like its white-flowered ancestor.

It is known under several cultivar names such as 'Black', 'Blackcurrant Swirl', 'Cornucopaea', 'Double Blackcurrant Swirl', 'Double Purple', and 'Purple Hindu'. It has also received many scientific names which should not be used for a cultivar:

  • Datura hummatu var. fastuosa (L.) Bernh.
  • Datura fastuosa L.
  • Datura metel f. fastuosa (L.) Danert
  • Datura metel var. fastuosa (L.) Saff.
  • Stramonium fastuosum (L.) Moench

Botanical description

The plant has the following characteristics:[5]

  • Habit - Large, erect and stout herb
  • Root - Branched tap root system
  • Stem - The stem is hollow, green and herbaceous with strong odour
  • Leaf - Simple, alternate, petiolate, entire or deeply lobed, glabrous showing unicostate reticulate venation and exstipulate.
  • Inflorescence - Solitary and axillary cyme
  • Flower - Large, greenish white, bracteate, ebracteolate, pedicellate, complete, dichlamydeous, pentamerous, regular, actinomorphic, bisexual, and hypogynous
  • Calyx - Sepals 5, green, gamosepalous showing valvate aestivation. Calyx is mostly persistent and odd sepal is posterior in position.
  • Corolla - Petals 5, greenish white, gamopetalous, plicate showing twisted aestivation, funnel shaped with wide mouth and 10-lobed.
  • Androecium - Stamens 5, free from one another, epipetalous, alternate the petals and are inserted inside the middle of the corolla tube. Anthers are basifixed, dithecous with long filament, introrse and longitudinally dehiscent.
  • Gynoecium - Ovary superior, syncarpous and bicarpellary. Ovary is basically bilocular but tetralocular due to false septa. Carpels are obliquely place and ovules on swollen axile placenta. Style simple, long and filiform. Stigma is two lobed.
  • Fruit - Spinescent capsule opening by four apical valves with persistent calyx.
  • Seed - Endospermous

References

  1. ^ "Datura metel L. (Solanaceae)". Globinmed. Global Information Hub On Integrated Medicine. Retrieved 28 March 2017.
  2. ^ Safford, William E. (19 April 1921). "Synopsis of the genus Datura". Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences. 11 (8): 173–189. JSTOR 24532461.
  3. ^ a b c Preissel, Ulrike; Preissel, Hans-Georg (2002). Brugmansia and Datura: Angel's Trumpets and Thorn Apples. Buffalo, New York: Firefly Books. pp. 120–123. ISBN 978-1-55209-598-0.
  4. ^ Michelson (2008). "Datura ingestion: a review of literature and case reports". Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicological Studies. 25 (7): 198–209.
  5. ^ Biology Botany Higher secondary second year, Tamil Nadu board Edition - 2008

"
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Datura metel: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Datura metel is a shrub-like annual (zone 5-7) or perennial (zone 8-10) herb, commonly known as devil's trumpet and metel. Datura metel grows in the wild in all the warmer parts of the world, such as India and is cultivated worldwide for its chemical and ornamental properties. This plant was first described by Carl Linnaeus in 1753, but no botanically correct illustrations or descriptions were made until after the New World was settled. The original home of the plant remains uncertain as a result.

The plant is an annual or perennial herb growing up to 3 ft (0.91 m) high. It is slightly furry, with dark violet shoots and oval to broad oval leaves that are often dark violet as well. The pleasantly-scented 6–8 in (15–20 cm) flowers are immensely varied, and can be single or double. Colors range from white to cream, yellow, red, and violet. The seed capsule is covered with numerous conical humps and a few spines. It is similar to D. innoxia, but D. metel has almost glabrous leaves and fruits that are knobby, not spiny. D. innoxia is pilose all over and has a spiny fruit.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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